Annex 5: Example of complete feasibility grid

Dimensions Potential approaches Useful for Criteria 1: Individual Criteria 2: Community Criteria 3: Structural
Economic

Cash-basedassistance.

High level of non-productive debt; lack or insufficiency of incomegenerating activity; acute vulnerabilities; remote locations or where access is limited.

  • The respondent has pressing and immediate vulnerabilities relative to his or her community.
  • Providing cash-based assistance would not pose a protection risk to the individual.
  • Cash-based assistance will be of sufficient value to enable the returnee to escape their cycle of debt.
  • Other members of the community are receiving cash-based assistance.
  • There is low risk of tension between returnees and non-returnees over receipt of cash-based assistance.
  • There is infrastructure to safely deliver cashbased assistance (such as SIM cards).

Providing non-cash assistance.

High level of non-productive debt; lack or insufficiency of incomegenerating activity.

  • The respondent has pressing and immediate needs relative to his or her community.
  • Providing in-kind aid would not pose a protection risk to the individual.
  • Other members of the community are receiving inkind assistance.
  • There is little tension between returnees and non-returnees over receipt of such assistance.
  • It is safe to purchase specific forms of assistance on behalf of beneficiaries.
  • Partners from whom goods are purchased can be relied upon without concerns of corruption or misuse of funds.

Job placement.

Lack or insufficiency of incomegenerating activity.

  • The respondent has relevant job skills.
  • The respondent is interested in receiving a job placement.
  • They have access to job markets and job sites.
  • Employment is high in the area.
  • There are employers that are looking to hire.
  • There are main industries of employment in the community and nearby areas.
  • There is a job placement scheme in the country that the respondent can participate in.

Business Development Support.

Lack or insufficiency of incomegenerating activity.

  • The beneficiary has a genuine commitment to the business approach, and the basic capacity and skills to run a sustainable business.
  • The beneficiary has a feasible and marketoriented business plan.
  • The foreseeable impact of the business on the local community and market system is positive or neutral.
  • There is a sufficient market for the business to succeed in the community.
  • Not many similar businesses already exist.
  • The business does not adversely impact the community’s natural environment.102
  • The business does not pose environmental risks for the community (such as unsustainable use of natural resource inputs, waste management, pollution).
  • The business may contribute to building the community’s resilience to climate change.
  • The legal context allows for the business.
  • The business is socioculturally appropriate.
  • The levels of violence and conflict are low enough to allow the business to succeed.
  • The business is not subject to environmental risks (such as climate change, poor water supply, land degradation, natural hazards).

Business start-up grant.

Lack or insufficiency of incomegenerating activity

  • The respondent has a realistic business plan.
  • The respondent has the skills necessary to achieve the plan.
  • They are genuinely interested in starting a business.
  • The business leverages existing skill sets of the returnee.
  • There is sufficient market for the business to succeed in the community.
  • Not many similar businesses already exist.
  • The legal context allows for the business.
  • The levels of violence and conflict are low enough to permit the business to succeed.
  • The business is culturally appropriate

Vocational training.

Lack or insufficiency of incomegenerating activity.

  • The respondent lacks relevant job-related skills. The respondent is willing to participate in a training scheme.
  • The vocational training programme links to the available livelihood opportunities in the community
  • Training schemes are available in the country.

Scholarship for primary or secondary education.

Lack or insufficiency of incomegenerating activity.

  • The respondent lacks primary or secondary education.
  • They are interested in going to school.
  • They have a rough idea of how they plan to use their education after school to gain an income.
  • The community has public or private schools that can accommodate the respondent.
  • More education will lead to better job opportunities.
  • There are no cultural or gender barriers facing the respondent.

Scholarship for tertiary education.

Lack or insufficiency of incomegenerating activity

  • The respondent has successfully completed secondary education.
  • The respondent is interested in tertiary education.
  • The respondent has an idea of how to use their tertiary education after completion.
  • The community has public or private schools that can accommodate the respondent.
  • If not, there is a school that is reachable nearby that can provide the education.
  • More education leads to better job opportunities.
  • There are no major cultural or gender barriers facing the respondent.

Consolidating employment and education records.

Lack or insufficiency of incomegenerating activity.

  • The respondent has documentation from education and employment attained while living abroad.
  • Certificates and degrees from abroad are perceived positively in the community.
  • Review national regulations around certificates and degrees (from abroad) to obtain a job.
  • These documents add value to help beneficiaries access adequate or betterpaying jobs.

Financial management training.

High level of non-productive debt.

  • The respondent is interested in receiving financial management training.
  • They are available to participate fully in the training.
  • There are financial management and literacy training programmes available in the community.
  • There are financial management and literacy training programmes provided by the government.

Microsaving.

High level of non-productive debt.

  • The respondent is interested in saving money.
  • They lack access to traditional banks and savings and credit unions.
  • They have sufficient income to make such an intervention relevant.
  • Microsaving programmes are available in the community.
  • The government or banks provide microsaving programmes nationally.
  • Banking systems are trustworthy and widely used.

Self-help groups.

High level of non-productive debt.

  • The respondent is interested in participating in a selfhelp group.
  • Self-help groups are available in the community.
  • Self-help groups are supported by national regulation.

Savings and credit associations.

High level of non-productive debt.

  • The respondent is interested in saving money. They have sufficient income to make such an intervention relevant.
  • There are savings or credit associations available in the community.
  • n/a

Monetizing productive assets.

Lack or insufficiency of incomegenerating activity.

  • The respondent has productive assets.
  • The asset can constitute a source of livelihood.
  • There is a market for the services that come from the asset.
  • The legal context allows for monetizing the productive asset.
  • It is safe to monetize the productive asset.

102 Examples of environmental screening questions can be found at the end of each module of the IOM Project Handbook (2nd edition, Geneva, 2017). Other simplified screening tools could be useful, such as the World Food Programme's (WFP) Environmental and Social Screening Tool (Consultation Version) (Rome, 2018). It may be necessary or advisable to engage with or refer to specialist organizations. In some cases, national legislation may require a full Environmental Assessment Impact (EIA) but this is usually only for large-scale projects.

Dimensions Potential approaches Useful for Criteria 1: Individual Criteria 2: Community Criteria 3: Structural
Social

Assistance identifying housing (list of places).

Inadequate housing situation.

  • The returnee lacks information on affordable or accessible housing options.
  • There are affordable or available housing options in the community.
  • There are publicly provided housing options.

Rent support and or temporary housing.

Inadequate housing situation.

  • The returnee is unable to pay for his or her housing.
  • They are unlikely to be able to pay for their housing in the near future.
  • The rent is fair for the market.
  • The overall standard of housing in the community is decent.
  • There are public housing schemes in the country.

Payment of school fees and books and uniforms.

Access to education for school-aged children.

  • The returnee is unable to pay for their child’s education.
  • They are taking on debt to pay for education.
  • Children are being forced to work instead of going to school.
  • There are schools in the community that are within a reasonable distance.
  • They are of adequate quality.
  • The state of education in the country is decent in terms of access and quality.

Case manager physically accompanies returnee to access services.

Lack of access to civil documentation; public services and social protection schemes; remedies, justice and law; health care; education.

  • The returnee needs hands-on guidance to better access services.
  • Public services are accessible, affordable and adequate in the country.
  • It is appropriate for the case manager to accompany the returnee to government offices.
  • There are programmes focusing on social safety nets in the country (such as PSN in Ethiopia).

Provide information on services (infosheet, website, counselling).

Lack of access to civil documentation; public services; remedies, justice or law; health care; education.

  • The returnee lacks information on how to access one or more types of services.
  • The returnee can read. If not, the information should be delivered orally.
  • The returnee is interested in information on how to access key services.
  • Lack of documentation impacts access to services in the community.
  • There are public services or social safety nets in the community.
  • Most people in the community rely on formal or informal systems of justice.
  • There are health-care options in the community that are within a reasonable distance and are affordable.
  • There is clear guidance on the process to access key services (civil documentation, public services, justice and law, health care, education).
  • There are informal channels for accessing these services.
Dimensions Potential approaches Useful for Criteria 1: Individual Criteria 2: Community Criteria 3: Structural
Psychosocial

Identification and referral to identified clinical service providers.

Returnees with mental disorders.

  • Are psychiatrists, clinical psychologists, mental health workers or physicians available in the country of origin?
  • Is the community aware of, and ready to receive, a returnee with a mental disorder?
  • Are clinical care services available? Are informal care services (traditional healers, herbalists) available?

Identification and referral to identified psychological counselling and psychotherapy service providers.

Returnees who show high emotional distress.

  • Are psychologists, social workers or psychological counsellors available in the country of origin?
  • Are social support services and community organizations available?
  • Are informal care services available (pastoral and other counselling services)?

Identification and referral to generic psychosocial support providers.

Returnees with emotional, psychological, social difficulties.

  • Are psychosocial support experts or counsellors available?
  • Are community networks available? Are peer support mechanisms or religious or social congregations available?
  • Are governmental and non-governmental social services available?

Counselling to the family before and after return.

Domestic conflict.

  • Does the returnee’s family want counselling or information on what to expect from the returnee? Do they appear to display a low level of understanding of the migration and return experiences?
  • Would such information be well-received by families and communities?
  • Is such counselling culturally appropriate?

Interventions to reduce exposure to violence and crime (supporting work in the daytime, assisting with night-time transportation, and so forth)

Feelings of security.

  • Are there relevant interventions that could help the returnee feel safer?
  • Are the feelings of insecurity unique to the returnee or common to the community?
  • What is the level of conflict and violence in the area?

Supporting returnees’ associations.

Isolation from the community and absence of support network.

  • Does the respondent lack social connections or a support network? Does he or she want to participate in a returnees’ association?
  • Are there other returnees in the community who are interested in joining such an organization?
  • n/a

Mentorship programme.

Isolation from the community and absence of support network.

  • Does the respondent want to be connected with a mentor? Would a mentorship programme benefit the returnee? Do available mentors have experience that would support the returnee’s psychosocial reintegration?
  • Who in the community is an appropriate mentor?
  • Are there existing mentorship programmes for entrepreneurs in the country? Can diaspora members play this role?

Introduction to CBOs, community leaders, religious groups, clubs.

Isolation from the community and absence of support network.

  • Does the respondent lack contacts in the community? Does he or she wish to be introduced to contacts in the community?
  • Does the community hold bias or prejudice against returnees? What are the public attitudes towards returnees?
  • n/a

Providing psychosocial support during training.

Signs of psychosocial distress.

  • Is the respondent participating in a training scheme? Is he or she showing signs of psychosocial distress?
  • Is there any prejudice towards psychosocial support in the community?
  • Is it taboo to access psychosocial support services in the countries? Are psychosocial support services providers widely available?

Community conversations.

Isolation from the community and absence of support network.

  • Does the respondent lack social connections and or a support network? Does he or she want to participate in community conversations? Is he or she willing to share his or her experience as a returnee?
  • Does the community hold bias or prejudice against returnees?
  • What are the public attitudes towards returnees?

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